Using and reusing coherence to realize quantum processes

Abstract

Coherent superposition is a key feature of quantum mechanics that underlies the advantage of quantum technologies over their classical counterparts. Recently, coherence has been recast as a resource theory in an attempt to identify and quantify it in an operationally well-defined manner. Here we study how the coherence present in a state can be used to implement a quantum channel via incoherent operations and, in turn, to assess its degree of coherence. We introduce the robustness of coherence of a quantum channel-which reduces to the homonymous measure for states when computed on constant-output channels-and prove that: i) it quantifies the minimal rank of a maximally coherent state required to implement the channel; ii) its logarithm quantifies the amortized cost of implementing the channel provided some coherence is recovered at the output; iii) its logarithm also quantifies the zero-error asymptotic cost of implementation of many independent copies of a channel. We also consider the generalized problem of imperfect implementation with arbitrary resource states. Using the robustness of coherence, we find that in general a quantum channel can be implemented without employing a maximally coherent resource state. In fact, we prove that every pure coherent state in dimension larger than 2 , however weakly so, turns out to be a valuable resource to implement some coherent unitary channel. We illustrate our findings for the case of single-qubit unitary channels.

Publication
Quantum
Xin Wang
Xin Wang
Associate Professor

The main focus of my research is to better understand the limits of information processing with quantum systems and the power of quantum artificial intelligence.